Agriculture

South Sudan’s Changing Tastes: Conflict, displacement and food imports

Year of Publication
2020
Document Publisher/Creator
Deng Kuol, Edward Thomas and Et al
Institution/organisation
The Rift Valley Institute
NGO associated?
Source URL
https://riftvalley.net/sites/default/files/publication-documents/South%20Sudan%27s%20Changing%20Tastes%20-%20RVI%20X-Border%20Project%20%282020%29_0.pdf
Summary
Over the past four decades, most South Sudanese people have begun buying staple foods rather than eating self-grown grains and tubers. This is part of a wider move towards markets, closely connected to South Sudan’s first encounters with modernity in the nineteenth century, as well as the conflicts and mass displacements of the past fifty years.

This move has deeply affected food systems, diminishing the availability of indigenous grains and impoverishing many people’s diets. South Sudanese farmers are growing cereals and tubers commercially, while traders are importing grain across its borders from neighbouring countries, deepening South Sudan’s integration into a regional grain economy. These imported staples are diversifying South Sudanese diets, as well as changing consumption habits and food preparation methods.

This report examines how South Sudanese tastes and imports are changing from the perspective of consumers and traders living in the capital, Juba. Going beyond issues of food security and crises, it scrutinizes the religious and cultural significance of food, as well as how shifting tastes and imports can provide clear, unspectacular explanations for everyday suffering and violence
Date of Publication
07/09/2020

Climate Services Model for South Sudan’s Rural Farmers and Agro-pastoralists

Year of Publication
2018
Document Publisher/Creator
Nhial Tiitmamer and Augustino Ting Mayai
Institution/organisation
The Sudd Institute
NGO associated?
Source URL
https://www.suddinstitute.org/publications/show/5c037bbc30c1b
Summary
Using experimental data from a pilot project administered in rural Tonj South, Aweil West, and Aweil North, this paper studies climate services reception and application in South Sudan. The pilot climate service was first of its kind directly delivered to farmers and agro-pastoralists in the country. The results are encouraging: a vast majority of the project beneficiaries received climate conditions advice, used it, trusted it, and are now interested to make use of such services in the future. This positive reception implies a growing interest by agro-pastoralists and farmers to use weather forecasts to make informed farming decisions. We recommend a number of policies to strengthen this interest, with the objective of improving livelihoods for the rural population. First, there is need to establish a permanent national technical working group on climate services to coordinate, review, translate and disseminate climate information to key end users (e.g., agro-pastoralists, farmers, health professionals, airlines, etc). Support for this group could be drawn from the Global Environment Facility. Second, a financial and meteorological strategy for long-term climate services in South Sudan is desired. Third, the stakeholders should institute a climate data sharing agreement for more informed coordination and decision-making. These data would need generating using equipment that meets the World Meteorological Organization’s (WMO) standards. Fourth, more studies to increase understanding of the role of traditional rainmakers and Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK), creating an integrated climate services model to inform livelihoods and policies, are suggested. Finally, the stakeholders should mobilize resources to improve national capacity on climate information by strengthening South Sudan Meteorological Department through equipment acquisition, training and exchange visits with global forecasting centers, such NOAA’s Africa Training Desk.
Date of Publication
08/09/2020

Grains As Life: The value of sorghum and millet amongst the Abyei Dinka

Year of Publication
2020
Document Publisher/Creator
Deng Kuol
Institution/organisation
The Rift Valley Institute
Topic
NGO associated?
Source URL
http://riftvalley.net/publication/grains-life-value-sorghum-and-millet-amongst-abyei-dinka
Summary
In this piece, Deng Kuol explains the significance of grains for his pastoralist Ngok Dinka community—more commonly associated with cattle—in the borderland region of Abyei. To illustrate this, Deng describes the efforts made by his mother to preserve access to a socially valued variety of sorghum—ruath—by travelling into military occupied areas of Abyei while her family was displaced outside their home areas. The story illustrates how, for the Dinka community in South Sudan, grains are indeed ‘life’.
Date of Publication
09/09/2020

Food Price Monitoring and Analysis

Year of Publication
2020
Document Publisher/Creator
UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)
NGO associated?
Source URL
http://www.fao.org/3/cb0974en/cb0974en.pdf
Summary
The report provides the latest food price developments at world, regional and national level. It focuses on countries where prices are abnormally high, based on GIEWS analysis and the Indicator of Food Price Anomalies (IFPA) for SDG target 2.c.

Attachment
Date of Publication
11/09/2020

Migrating with Seeds: Women, agricultural knowledge and displacement in South Sudan

Year of Publication
2020
Document Publisher/Creator
Elizabeth Nyibol
Topic
NGO associated?
Source URL
https://www.csrf-southsudan.org/repository/migrating-with-seeds-women-agricultural-knowledge-and-displacement-in-south-sudan/
Summary
Displaced Tastes is a research project run by the Rift Valley Institute in partnership with the Catholic University of South Sudan under the X-Border Local Research Network. The project examines the changing tastes for food in South Sudan in the context of the country’s economic transition and place in the regional, cross-border economy of grain. In this piece, Elizabeth Nyibol describes the lifestory of her aunt, Mary Ajok Wetkwuot, who throughout her life has demonstrated a commitment to growing the indigenous grains of her Dinka community—varieties of sorghum and millet—which she carried with her while living much of her life in displacement. The account shows how Mary, like many other Dinka women, deployed the social and material capital of seeds under her control to manage the wider transitions experienced during South Sudan’s decades of war.

This briefing is a product of the X-Border Local Research Network, a component of DFID’s Cross- Border Conflict—Evidence, Policy and Trends (XCEPT) programme, funded by UKaid from the UK government. The programme carries out research work to better understand the causes and impacts of conflict in border areas and their international dimensions. It supports more effective policymaking and development programming and builds the skills of local partners
Date of Publication
16/09/2020

Food Price Monitoring and Analysis (FPMA)

Year of Publication
2020
Document Publisher/Creator
FAO
Topic
NGO associated?
Source URL
http://newsletters.fao.org/c/1ZJhjhH9VbqA9bUoXRKjiH20
Summary
The bulletin provides the latest food price developments at world, regional and national level. It focuses on countries where prices are abnormally high, based on GIEWS analysis and the Indicator of Food Price Anomalies (IFPA) for SDG target 2.c.
Date of Publication
18/09/2020

Trade and Sustainable Development Goal 2 – Policy options and their trade-offs

Year of Publication
2020
Document Publisher/Creator
FAO
Topic
NGO associated?
Source URL
https://doi.org/10.4060/cb0580en
Summary
With trade recognized as a means of implementation under Agenda 2030, policy-makers will need to ensure that trade, and policies affecting trade and markets, are taken into consideration as part of their efforts to achieve SDG 2. The five targets that set out the level and ambition of SDG 2 (ending hunger; ending all forms of malnutrition; doubling the agricultural productivity and incomes of small-scale food producers; ensuring sustainable food production systems; and maintaining genetic diversity), as well as trade itself, often constitute distinct policy priorities for governments. Trade and related policy measures that may be designed to achieve one target can potentially have unintended negative consequences that undermine the achievement of other targets, both within the country where the measure is applied and in the trading partner countries. It is therefore important that policy-makers identify and recognize areas in which difficult tradeoffs may be needed between competing policy objectives, and identify possible ways in which these can be addressed. Furthermore, while the different targets set out under SDG 2 are mutually interdependent and inter-related, it is important to address the trade policy dimension of each component individually as part of a broader plan of action.
Attachment
Date of Publication
28/09/2020

South Sudan and Climate Change Trends - Looking to 2050

Year of Publication
2020
Document Publisher/Creator
PHILIP OMONDI
NGO associated?
Source URL
https://www.csrf-southsudan.org/repository/south-sudan-and-climate-change-trends-looking-to-2050/
Summary
The effects of climate change are expected to be greatest in the Horn of Africa countries, particularly those, such as South Sudan, whose populations are reliant on rain-fed agricultural production to meet their food and income needs. As one of the least developed countries in the world, South Sudan’s population is dependent on climate sensitive natural resources for their livelihoods, making the country particularly vulnerable to the effects of climate change. South Sudan’s future economy will be significantly influenced by climate change and the potential for socio-economic losses and damages due to climate change is one of the largest unknowns in the country’s future.

This CSRF briefing paper explores current climate context and trends in South Sudan, peers into the future of climate change and reflects on consequences of it on the economic and climate sensitive sectors in South Sudan. Lastly, the briefing paper suggests responses for policy and practice such as providing climate sensitive aid and supporting the Government of South Sudan to develop AND implement a national strategy for climate change adaptation and mitigation.
Date of Publication
03/09/2020

SPECIAL REPORT: 2019 FAO/WFP Crop and Food Security Assessment Mission (CFSAM) to the Republic of South Sudan

Year of Publication
2020
Document Publisher/Creator
FAO & WFP
NGO associated?
Source URL
https://www.csrf-southsudan.org/repository/special-report-2019-fao-wfp-crop-and-food-security-assessment-mission-cfsam-to-the-republic-of-south-sudan-27-may-2020/
Summary
An FAO/WFP Crop and Food Security Assessment Mission (CFSAM) visited South Sudan from 15 to 20 December 2019 to estimate the cereal production during 2019 and assess the overall food security situation in the country. The CFSAM reviewed the findings of several Crop Assessment Missions conducted from June to December 2019 at planting and harvest time in different agro-ecological zones of the country.
Attachment
Date of Publication
08/09/2020

Conflict, Mobility and Markets: Changing food systems in South Sudan

Year of Publication
2020
Document Publisher/Creator
Loes Lijnders
Institution/organisation
The Rift Valley Institute
NGO associated?
Source URL
http://riftvalley.net/sites/default/files/publication-documents/Conflict%2C%20Mobility%20and%20Markets%20by%20Loes%20Lijnders%20-%20RVI%20X-Border%20Project%20%282020%29.pdf
Summary
The project examines how experiences of conflict, regional displacement and mobility, and the shift to an increasingly market-oriented and import-dependent economy have changed what people in South Sudan grow and eat. The research focuses on the country’s borderland spaces, or locations where South Sudan’s interaction with the regionalized market in grains and other foods is most evident, like food markets in Juba. Furthermore, the research looks at experiences with border-crossing and regional displacement and how these can be studied through changing food systems.
Date of Publication
09/09/2020